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20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that runner should start to sprint soon as america begins to reap the rewards of its domestic energy boom. we're extracting record amounts of oil and gas from shale through fracking and other technologies. pushing prices for natural gas which is used in part to generate electricity down. that helps utilities and heavy industry compete. creating more jobs for americans, all of these things put together are sending my runner, the u.s. economy, dashing ever faster down that road toward an economic renaissance. one that offers real prosperity. real jobs for years to come. but running fast on this road requires something else -- an investment in infrastructure. and that's a subject of discussion i really had with harvard professor ken rogoff, "wall street journal" editorial righter. and i started off by asking how can you convince lawmakers that infrastructure money is well spent and how can you insure that the money is in fact well spent? >> i think you have to have firm regulatory oversight. it's not something you can just spend the money and walk away from. but there are the electricity grid, w
speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking points by the cia. she went on a defensive. and president obama left her, john, twisting slowly, slowly in the wind. she's gone. >> she'll still be our u.n. ambassador, though, pat. i give worst politician to mitt romn
believe that human beings have what i call discretionary energy that they can give you or not. and i don't think that they will give it to you if they don't feel that they're treated with dignity and respect every day. i'm treated with dignity and respect. a down payment on that is nobody ever gets hurt here is because we care about our own commitment to our safety, and we care about the people we work with. it swells up to into you do, it gives you a sense of pride with the organization you're involved with. >> then thyou ask them for extr productivity. >> you don't have to ask them. they turn it loose. we went from 1.86 per 100 per year to cause them to miss a work day. we got to 0.13. to give you a reference point, the number in health medical care institutions in the united states is five, right? >> and now described what happened to alcoa commercially, financially under your term. >> well, we -- i think we improved market capitalization of the company 900% while i was there. the market company valued at $4 billion to $28 billion in 13 years. >> and you attribute that to -- the start
revolution and energy gas revolution and unemployment remains persistently high. >> first, we have to focus on that. unemployment being this high is not just an economic problem, it's a social problem. we have to fight it. policymakers need to do even more to make sure that the ban is there in the economy. >> what does that mean? >> to me that would be a more sensible resolution of the budget deal so that we have less austerity today, but a glide path toward much more austerity in the future. >> would you be in favor of a stimulus today? >> i think it depends on what you mean by a stimulus and in what form. we have to talk about the short-term economy. you asked about how the u.s. looks. to me, if you looked around the world and said you can only pick one country's opportunities and problems to own, what would you want? unquestionably for me, it is the united states. >> would you agree with that? >> think about energy, tech, innovation potential, this country's demographics, this is the country i would want to be. >> i completely agree with everything that glenn said. in fact, i'm surprised
president george h.w. bush could spend christmas in hospital. doctors say he needs to build up his energy before he goes home. >> gregg: we certainly wish him well and speedy recovery. new government report, holiday hiring is fast approaching a 12-year record, great news? you have to ask yourself how many of she is seasonal jobs will be made permanent or they just vanish come january 2nd. how do we stimulate the growth of the higher paid jobs in technology and manufacturing that we really need to get the economy moving again. joining us is brenda buttner. good to see you. that is the good news. seasonal hiring is a record high? >> yeah it really is. we have had some reports from that basically we've seen 20% increase of holiday hiring from last year. amazon, target both reporting 21% more increase in hiring. >> gregg: how long are those going to hang around? >> that is a good question. we always see a drop-off that cliff of the employment cliff in january. what is more revealing we're seeing so much increase of hiring it was mainly in november. i would like to see december's numbers. we e
into energy, into immigration, entrepreneurship and a lot of other areas where we think policies f they change -- if they change, can promote growth. so i thank you all for coming. thank you, mr. president, and, please, pick up your book on the way out. [applause] and read it. ?rsh. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> next, chrystia freeland talks about the rides of the super rich, the top .1% of the global population. and the impact they have in the world. this talk was hosted by politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of beg
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)